Persimmon Jam

A great way to save, and savor, the abundance of this delicate fruit. It doesn't keep long so making a jam to enjoy well after the season is over is so worth the effort!
By | August 28, 2015

Ingredients

  • 10 cups persimmon juice (mixture from boiling 10–12 cups of fruit with 2 cups of apple juice)
  • 10 cups sugar
  • 2 boxes pectin (2/3 cup; add more if a very firm gel is desired)
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 1–2 teaspoons cinnamon, to taste

About this recipe

Note: If you halve the recipe, be sure to halve the cooking time. Do not double this recipe. It will be too hard to get a consistent gel in the cooking. If you want to skip the pectin, then double the lemon juice and add a little more sugar and cook out more water in the first step.

Put 10–12 cups of persimmons, halved, into a large boiling pot with 2 cups of apple juice. Let come to a rolling boil for 10 minutes, long enough to soften the fruit completely. Then strain (if you have seeds) or process with pulp in a blender or food mill, depending on the texture preferred. I use a coarse strainer so it is a thicker jelly, not quite a jam either, still cloudy. I like it to be smooth but still have some texture from the pulp. This averages to yield about 10 cups of juice if you do not keep all the pulp. The acid from the apple and lemon juice help the pectin do its job. I prefer fresh lemon juice though the acid level is less consistent. Neither juice adds a noticeable flavor layer, but they help balance the sweetness and enhance the unique fruit flavor without distracting.

Return juice to stove, add lemon and bring to a rolling boil for 2 minutes. Add the sugar and cinnamon and let return to a boil for 2 minutes. If using the low-sugar pectin, use half the sugar-to-fruit ratio. Add pectin and let boil for 2 minutes. Liquid should gel on a frozen spoon after 2 minutes of rest.

Canning -

Place the closed jars in a hot water bath and steam for about 20 minutes. Take out, cool, and store. You should hear the seal pop, if the jar does not seal, you may refrigerate and use for up to a month.  

I serve mine with soft cheese on crackers and a good minerally white wine. It makes the best glaze on pork chops with rosemary, but honestly, my favorite way to eat it is melted on top of a fried egg on toast. Those deep tannins, with their sweet, chalky taste laced with a hint of cinnamon add an unexpected pop to the world’s perfect food, the fried egg.

Ingredients

  • 10 cups persimmon juice (mixture from boiling 10–12 cups of fruit with 2 cups of apple juice)
  • 10 cups sugar
  • 2 boxes pectin (2/3 cup; add more if a very firm gel is desired)
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 1–2 teaspoons cinnamon, to taste
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